.... The aim is to retrieve missing artifacts, investigate reports of new ones and understand the importance of what they are doing.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Friday, December 27, 2013

Trundholm Sun Chariot and Langstrup Plate

Read please this post, very interesting

Les dues vides del Carro Solar de Trundholm, Publicat per Albert
títol del TREBALL DE FINAL DE GRAU,  carrera d'Humanitats  a la UNIVERSITAT POMPEU FABRA.
at http://alauniversitat.blogspot.it/2013/11/les-dues-vides-del-carro-solar-de.html

And also http://news.discovery.com/history/archaeology/bronze-age-calendar-120330.htm




See also: http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.2512
Ancient bronze disks, decorations and calendars, Amelia Carolina Sparavigna
(12 Mar 2012) Recently, it was published that some ancient bronze disks could had been calendars, that is, that their decorations had this function. Here I am discussing an example, the disk of the Trundholm Sun Chariot, proposing a new interpretation of it, giving a calendar of 360 days. Some geometric diagrams concerning the decoration layout are also proposed. Comments: Ancient calendars, ancient time-keeping, Bronze Age, Trundholm Sun Chariot
Cite as: arXiv:1203.2512 [physics.pop-ph]

See also http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.4103
Number pi from the decoration of the Langstrup plate, Amelia Carolina Sparavigna
(19 Mar 2012), Studies of ancient bronze artifacts can be useful in understanding the progression of human knowledge of mathematics and geometry. Here I discuss the decoration composed by several circles and spirals of the Langstrup belt disk, an artifact of the Bronze Age found in Denmark. I am showing by measurements of diameters and distances of spirals, that the artist who made the decoration knew some approximations by rational numbers of the number pi, the dimensionless physical quantity representing the ratio of circumference to diameter. Comments: Ancient measurements of pi as ratio of circumference and diameters, giving rational numbers,
Cite as: arXiv:1203.4103 [physics.pop-ph]

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

The Spirit of St. Louis


Courtesy: Britannica Kids

More at http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/art-59895/Charles-Lindbergh-stands-in-front-of-his-monoplane-the-Spirit

Monday, October 7, 2013

Music and dance


Music and dance, China

Museo Arte orientale Torino

Bo bell


Bronze bo bell, China, Shaanxi, Eastern Zhou, 5th Century BC 
Mueso Arte Orientale Torino

This bronze bell is known as a bo. It has a handle in the shape of two dragons. It is played with a hammer and plays two different notes depending on where it is struck.
More at BBC

Probably this is the component of a Bianzhong (simplified Chinese: 编钟; traditional Chinese: 編鐘), an ancient Chinese musical instrument consisting of a set of bronze bells. Below the Bianzhong of the Marquis Yi of Zeng.


Thanks Spiritia, Wikipedia



Leonardo da Vinci and the friction


Studies of Leonardo da Vinci on friction, from the Arundel Code.

Sunday, July 14, 2013

Watchtower

Model of a watchtower, Henan, Eastern Han, second half of the 2nd century AD
Beige-pinkish earthenware with a pale green glaze



Museo d'Arte Orientale Torino

Friday, May 24, 2013

Linothorax

Da Wikipedia
"The linothorax is a modern term conventionally used to describe a type of upper body armor used by the Ancient Greeks, as well as other civilizations, from the Mycenaean Period through the Hellenistic Period. It is based on the Greek λινοθώραξ (in Homer λινοθώρηξ), which strictly is an adjective meaning "wearing a breastplate of linen" (and is not a noun meaning "linen armor" as often stated); the "linothorax" was made of linen, while a "thorax" was made of metal. The earliest attested account of a "linothorax" used for battle is recorded in Book 2 of Homer's Iliad (2.529 and 2.830). It is worn by Ajax the Lesser and is described in brief. Homer, composing long before the great armies of Athens, Thebes, Sparta or Alexander the Great, surely understood what the armor was. But the extent to which it was used can not be fully determined. An educated guess can be made, however, based on its use by Alexander the Great, and its mention by other sources such as Herodotus (2.182, 3.47, 7.63), Livy (4.19.2–20.7) and Strabo (Geography, 3.3.6, 13.1.10), and many others. The linothorax appears to have been used in place of the bronze 'bell cuirass' as the popular choice of armour for Greek hoplites, starting perhaps around the late seventh century and early sixth century B.C. Its high point, if vase paintings, sculptural reliefs and artistic depictions are to be believed, corresponds with the time of the Persian Wars. By the time of the Peloponnesian War it was still used, and continued to seemingly flourish well into the Hellenistic Period."

Friday, March 29, 2013

Excavator


Johannes de Fontana: Bellicorum instrumentorum liber cum figuris
BSB Cod.icon. 242 Venedig 1420 - 1430
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Fontana_(engineer)

Belli Instrumentum - 2


Johannes de Fontana: Bellicorum instrumentorum liber cum figuris
BSB Cod.icon. 242 Venedig 1420 - 1430

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Fontana_(engineer)




Belli Instrumentum - 1


Johannes de Fontana: Bellicorum instrumentorum liber cum figuris
BSB Cod.icon. 242 Venedig 1420 - 1430

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Fontana_(engineer)

Thursday, March 28, 2013

A door

“It’s a magic wardrobe. There’s a wood inside it, and it’s snowing! Come and see,” begged Lucy.

This is the door to Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, by C.S.Lewis

http://block-notes-art-literat.blogspot.it/2011/01/doors-to-aslan.html